8:31 am - Sat, Sep 20, 2014
323,425 notes

evererika:

deepinmyb0nes:

iamprogress:

"I think every woman at one point or another in their life has been called a bitch. For a long time I had a real problem with that word, I didn’t like it and I thought it was derogatory. But I’ve gotten to a place now where I’ve made a lot of peace with it. It’s been so overused and made to seem so derogatory towards woman that I’ve adapted it into an empowering feeling for myself. If I’m a bitch then I’m a bitch, if that’s what an assertive woman is to you. So I’ve sort of adapted it as a badge of honor."

TTTHHHIIISSSSS

A+

(Source: therealxtina, via fuckyeahloldemort)

Comments

8:30 am
201,545 notes
cookienun:

iraffiruse:

Technology then and now

at first i thought it was the same number then I noticed it said GB and damn

cookienun:

iraffiruse:

Technology then and now

at first i thought it was the same number then I noticed it said GB and damn

(via 10knotes)

Comments

8:28 am
389,196 notes

relyonloveonceinawhile:

whatmariadidnext:

two4fit:

TABLOID HEADLINES WITHOUT THE SEXISM

"WOMAN IN TRACKSUIT PROBABLY NOT DISOWNED BY ENTIRE FAMILY"

"It’s mildly breezy outside."

(via fuckyeahloldemort)

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8:19 am
17,849 notes

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8:17 am
40,977 notes

(Source: arabellesicardi, via 10knotes)

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8:16 am
33,865 notes

psych2go:

For more posts like these go to psych2go

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8:14 am
261,423 notes

stephaniedanielle:

Never gets old

(Source: johnnydepps, via fuckyeahloldemort)

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8:13 am
200,934 notes

(Source: bewbin, via coconutdoughnut)

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8:13 am
270,252 notes

elegancea:

If someone calls you ‘ugly’ have a good comeback and say ‘excuse me, I am not a mirror’. 

(via coconutdoughnut)

Comments

8:12 am
175,035 notes
geekygothgirl:

jmiah0192:

Japanese child actress Mana Ashida (little Mako) was embarrassed that she couldn’t pronounce Guillermo Del Toro’s name so he gave her special permission to call him “Totoro-san” instead.
My Neighbor Guillermo Del Toro.

If I don’t reblog this, assume I’m dead.

geekygothgirl:

jmiah0192:

Japanese child actress Mana Ashida (little Mako) was embarrassed that she couldn’t pronounce Guillermo Del Toro’s name so he gave her special permission to call him “Totoro-san” instead.

My Neighbor Guillermo Del Toro.

If I don’t reblog this, assume I’m dead.

(via coconutdoughnut)

Comments

8:11 am
575 notes
womenagainstfeminisnn:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feminism

Comments

8:10 am
36 notes

mongji-fan:

Samsung Thisisliving Woobin & JiHyo 140918

Samsung Vietnam FB <- HDHD~ Click in for more~

Comments

8:09 am
309,225 notes

(Source: frie-nds, via zinaaa)

Comments

8:09 am
376 notes
science-junkie:

Why do we bite our nails?By Tom Stafford
[…]Given this lack of prior scientific treatment, I feel free to speculate for myself. So, here is my theory on why people bite their nails, and how to treat it.
Let’s call it the ‘anti-theory’ theory. I propose that there is no special cause of nail biting – not breastfeeding, chronic anxiety or a lack of motherly love. The advantage of this move is that we don’t need to find a particular connection between me, Gordon, Jackie and Britney. Rather, I suggest, nail biting is just the result of a number of factors which – due to random variation – combine in some people to create a bad habit.
First off, there is the fact that putting your fingers in your mouth is an easy thing to do. It is one of the basic functions for feeding and grooming, and so it is controlled by some pretty fundamental brain circuitry, meaning it can quickly develop into an automatic reaction. Added to this, there is a ‘tidying up’ element to nail biting – keeping them short – which means in the short term at least it can be pleasurable, even if the bigger picture is that you end up tearing your fingers to shreds. This reward element, combined with the ease with which the behaviour can be carried out, means that it is easy for a habit to develop; apart from touching yourself in the genitals it is hard to think of a more immediate way to give yourself a small moment of pleasure, and biting your nails has the advantage of being OK at school. Once established, the habit can become routine – there are many situations in everyone’s daily life where you have both your hands and your mouth available to use.
Understanding nail-biting as a habit has a bleak message for a cure, unfortunately, since we know how hard bad habits can be to break. Most people, at least once per day, will lose concentration on not biting their nails.
Nail-biting, in my view, isn’t some revealing personality characteristic, nor a maladaptive echo of some useful evolutionary behaviour. It is the product of the shape of our bodies, how hand-to-mouth behaviour is built into (and rewarded in) our brains and the psychology of habit.
And, yes, I did bite my nails while writing this column. Sometimes even a good theory doesn’t help.

Read the full article

science-junkie:

Why do we bite our nails?
By Tom Stafford

[…]Given this lack of prior scientific treatment, I feel free to speculate for myself. So, here is my theory on why people bite their nails, and how to treat it.

Let’s call it the ‘anti-theory’ theory. I propose that there is no special cause of nail biting – not breastfeeding, chronic anxiety or a lack of motherly love. The advantage of this move is that we don’t need to find a particular connection between me, GordonJackie and Britney. Rather, I suggest, nail biting is just the result of a number of factors which – due to random variation – combine in some people to create a bad habit.

First off, there is the fact that putting your fingers in your mouth is an easy thing to do. It is one of the basic functions for feeding and grooming, and so it is controlled by some pretty fundamental brain circuitry, meaning it can quickly develop into an automatic reaction. Added to this, there is a ‘tidying up’ element to nail biting – keeping them short – which means in the short term at least it can be pleasurable, even if the bigger picture is that you end up tearing your fingers to shreds. This reward element, combined with the ease with which the behaviour can be carried out, means that it is easy for a habit to develop; apart from touching yourself in the genitals it is hard to think of a more immediate way to give yourself a small moment of pleasure, and biting your nails has the advantage of being OK at school. Once established, the habit can become routine – there are many situations in everyone’s daily life where you have both your hands and your mouth available to use.

Understanding nail-biting as a habit has a bleak message for a cure, unfortunately, since we know how hard bad habits can be to break. Most people, at least once per day, will lose concentration on not biting their nails.

Nail-biting, in my view, isn’t some revealing personality characteristic, nor a maladaptive echo of some useful evolutionary behaviour. It is the product of the shape of our bodies, how hand-to-mouth behaviour is built into (and rewarded in) our brains and the psychology of habit.

And, yes, I did bite my nails while writing this column. Sometimes even a good theory doesn’t help.

Read the full article

(via neuromorphogenesis)

Comments

8:08 am
2,950 notes
theniftyfifties:

Audrey Hepburn with her pet deer, Ip.

theniftyfifties:

Audrey Hepburn with her pet deer, Ip.

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